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wardrobe advice

still haven't found what i'm looking for

still haven't found what i'm looking for

Unlike in past jobs, now there's only one thing that keeps me up at night. And that's whether stores will have the items my clients need. I can find almost anything online, but when you need things within a few hours at one physical location, I always get anxious until I get in there and start finding pieces. I don't have control over what’s there. Almost always, my fears are unfounded and I find what we need. Except for last week, when I didn’t. Come on stores, where are the fun printed three-quarter sleeve poly blend blouses for my active chiropractor mom client? 

saint louis personal stylist - mindful basics

I was feeling terrible, but in the end, we did find the perfect dark high-waisted denim (on sale now for a great price!), the perfect long-sleeved white tee, and the perfect go over anything jacket. Not too bad and then we’ll both keep our eyes out for that blouse.  (this post contains affiliate links)

mindful shopping basics - st. louis personal stylist

how i feel about clothing subscription services

how i feel about clothing subscription services

I think they're great! I do! Overall, it's a very positive thing that people are realizing the need for, and searching for, someone or something to help them with their clothes. It's brought the phrase "personal stylist" into the mainstream lexicon. In case you've been living under a rock for the last few years, a subscription clothing service is a website that will mail you a box of clothing at set intervals, based on a questionnaire you take, your Pinterest boards, or other preferences. You can keep some or none or all of the clothes. A lot of my friends and a few of my clients use them. For some, it'll be great, others will try it for a time and then come to me anyway.   

Here's what a box can't do: a box can't help you clean out your closet. A box can't tell you how to deal with the well-meaning gifts of mother-in-laws. A box can't tell you that you need to let go of limiting beliefs about your body and what you should or should not be wearing. A box can't take your emergency calls or texts or suggest something to wear from your closet for a specific event (a couple of weeks ago, I had a client text me that she got invited to a cocktail event last minute. She thought she should make a last minute run to Nordstrom Rack. I calmed her down and sent a few new looks I created from her digital lookbook. She didn't have to buy anything and felt great at the event.)

If you do try a subscription service, watch out for a few things. Box services are taking advantage of the fact that when you get something in your home, you will allow it to stay just because it's there. Be picky. Try to imagine whether you would really buy this if you were in a store yourself. Sometimes, the quality to price ratio is very off - meaning you're paying a lot for poor quality items. Keep in mind that although you're not technically paying a fee for styling, it's often built in here. Be wary of the "keep it all, pay less" discount - you will be paying some amount for items you really don't need or want that will eventually clutter your closet.  

Try it out. If it works, that's awesome! I certainly can't match the price of picking things out for you ($0). If you need more than that, get in touch

What has been your experience? Have you tried a subscription clothing service?

P.S. These images are from the digital lookbook software I use where I can upload photos of items you own, create outfits in a "closet", and make recommendations of things you should add.  It's pretty sweet. 

P.P.S. Can I be snarky for juuust one minute? I really hate the Le Tote advertising slogan "Always have something new to wear". Is that really what we're aspiring to these days? A constant desire for new and exciting? Not very mindful or sustainable and a pretty bad philosophy for life - to always be looking for the next best thing.

how to wear ankle boots

how to wear ankle boots

 

 

 

client lookbook

client lookbook

Just for fun, a summer lookbook I put together for a client recently:

st louis personal stylist
st louis personal stylist
st louis personal stylist
st louis personal stylist

As always, there are many more combinations to be made, but only so much time...

why mindful closet?

why mindful closet?

exceptions to the rule

exceptions to the rule

In general, my philosophy is that if there is anything, any little thing, that bothers you about a garment, you shouldn't buy it. The reasoning is that those little things will never go away and will keep you from reaching for that item when you go to get dressed. Therefore, it ends up never being worn, and you'd have been better off not buying it in the first place. But...every once in a while, there's an exception to the rule. 

parker trey print blouse nordstrom

I would be my own worst client, because I'm super picky about what I like. I shop a lot and buy little. When I ordered this Parker blouse from Nordstrom, I was hoping it would meet all my criteria. It did...except. It didn't stay in place. The shirt slips back so that the low v-neck ends up at my adam's apple, and the hem shows my tummy. Not good. But I loved it! I love the print and the shape. I love that it can be layered for cooler weather, but is breezy for warm weather. I love that I can wear it with my favorite black pants for a dressier look or with boyfriend jeans for a casual look. I love that it's silk but not too delicate for wearing around a one-year-old.
I even asked for advice on Instagram

mindful closet saint louis personal stylist

I finally decided that my love for this top would override the rule. I'll always have to wear a camisole, and pin the blouse to the camisole so that it can't slip up. I can also use fashion tape for times when I don't want to wear a camisole. It's not the most elegant solution, but to me, it's worth it for a piece that I'll wear again and again.
What do you think? Should I have stuck to my guns?

P.S. These are my absolute favorite camisoles. They are silky, so nothing clings to them, long enough so they don't ride up, and affordable. Oh! And they have adjustable shoulder straps, which are the best!

P.P.S. This post contains affiliate links.

 

transitional dressing: postpartum

transitional dressing: postpartum

Several of my friends are getting to the postpartum oh-shit-I'm-no-longer-pregnant-but-nothing-fits stage. Well, guess what? Nothing should fit. Anyone who says differently is delusional or had a very unique experience. You just grew a human with your body! I didn't fit back into my pre-pregnancy jeans until around 11 months postpartum and I'd say I'm pretty lucky. And it's not just your tummy that's different, your body is holding onto fat stores all over (this article explains why). Here's my advice (and I don't say this very often): buy new stuff. It's the only solution. You need real clothes for the size you are.

You don't have to go all out (and you probably don't have the time). Budget a small amount. As I mentioned in this post about transitional dressing, this is one time it's ok to buy clothes that are inexpensive. See this post for nursing basics and why you want to buy things that you don't care about getting ruined.

When I started looking for a few examples for this post, I got a little jealous. I honestly feel like there are better options now than there were for me last summer! At minimum, you should have 1 or 2 pairs of jeans or other bottoms, a few fun non-clingy tops, a couple of decent basic tees in neutrals to dress up with jewelry and scarves, and a couple of nursing friendly dresses. Leggings can still work when you add one of these tunics for a little polish.

Here are a few of my picks for an affordable, indestructible, nursing-friendly wardrobe. Click the arrow on the right for more. Anyone else care to share their experience or advice?

(These images are affiliate links, which generate a few cents for me when you click but don't cost anything for you)